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FROM FRIDGE TO KITCHEN.

Food isn’t just a product, it’s a process — one that has underlying socio-economic and environmental implications. Let’s help clarify that process.

ask.

(Open-ended prompt from Egg Strategy.)

More people are buying groceries online, but not perishables (like yogurt). How can we get them to add these items to their basket?

KEY FINDINGS.

Most people who are buying groceries online do buy perishables. 65% of those who buy most of their groceries online purchase dairy products and fresh produce. The remaining minority prefer picking produce out in person, and grocery stores and delivery services are already innovating in order to allow these shoppers more control.

During our research, we uncovered a deeper problem surrounding perishables — the waste of them. By some estimates, a quarter of America’s consumable fruits and vegetables is thrown away. Part of that waste comes from household fridges, but a majority happens further upstream, before food even goes to market.

THE REFRAMED PROBLEM.

We realized that it appears not enough people are buying/consuming perishables. How can we ensure more produce ends up in our bodies rather than in landfills?

BRAND PARTNERSHIP.

We identified a company that’s tackling the issue of food waste upstream, but hasn’t received entirely positive feedback.

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Imperfect Produce takes fruits and vegetables deemed too ugly to go to market and sells them direct to consumers for 30% off market value, minimizing waste from production.

However, critics argue that Imperfect benefits a wealthy customer base and takes away from the supply for food banks and co-ops.

OUR GOAL.

Help Imperfect Produce connect with those who need fresh produce but lack access.

TARGET.

The food insecure, who face two major barriers when it comes to food.

Budget and time restrictions. Experimenting with new, different foods is a risk our target can’t afford. If they make a dish their family doesn’t like, they won’t have the money or time to buy ingredients and prepare another meal.

Lack of food knowledge and kitchen skills. Food isn’t just a product, it’s a process that’s typically learned from your family and friends, but some of us don’t grow up in households where we can learn the basics from childhood.

STRATEGY.

Expand Imperfect Produce’s focus from beyond the fridge to the kitchen by acknowledging that education is as much an ingredient in cooking as the food products are.

CREATIVE CONCEPT.

Start Imperfectly. It’s okay to know jack-squat about jack fruit.

Some healthy foods are hard to spell and pronounce (Siri even autocorrects bok choy to bob choy).

*mocked up by strategists for proof of concept

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Product extensions.

While Imperfect Produce accepts SNAP benefits, that’s not enough to help our target get comfortable in the kitchen.

Text-to-order and learn   Imperfect Produce’s D2C model is great since most people have a smartphone, but could benefit from an education component.

Text-to-order and learn

Imperfect Produce’s D2C model is great since most people have a smartphone, but could benefit from an education component.

“What’s for Dinner” Meal Education and Content Kit (in partnership with Stasher Bags)   Stasher bags are resealable, airtight bags that you can use to quickly steam food.  Packaging is meant to ship, cook, store, and return with ease.

“What’s for Dinner” Meal Education and Content Kit (in partnership with Stasher Bags)

Stasher bags are resealable, airtight bags that you can use to quickly steam food.

Packaging is meant to ship, cook, store, and return with ease.

Imperfect Kitchen Pop-Up Classes   Offered in the 17 cities where Imperfect Foods already has a distribution network.

Imperfect Kitchen Pop-Up Classes

Offered in the 17 cities where Imperfect Foods already has a distribution network.